Physics properties

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Jeri3d
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Physics properties

Post by Jeri3d » 13 Mar 2010, 11:43

Is there a list somewhere showing the elasticity etc of a whole range of materials?

froo
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Re: Physics properties

Post by froo » 13 Mar 2010, 15:23

you can google it. :bananacheers:

I don't think the trueSpace online manual has that info.

Jeri3d
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Re: Physics properties

Post by Jeri3d » 14 Mar 2010, 13:00

ahhhh I was hoping that someone in the TS community had built up a collection. By persistent hunting I've found info for other things. I have a few in an old copy of Machinery's Handbook.

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Finis
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Re: Physics properties

Post by Finis » 14 Mar 2010, 15:57

You'll probably need to convert from any units you find into the scale used by TS physics.

There is a table of the modulus of elasticity for some metals and alloys in section D of the CRC handbook of chemistry and physics (1984 - 1985).

Here's some:
http://www.engineersedge.com/manufactur ... erials.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.engineersedge.com/manufactur ... metals.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.engineersedge.com/manufactur ... rength.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
(Search that site. There may be more tables.)

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/young ... d_417.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.insaco.com/MatPages/matquery ... y&Count=10" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.machinist-materials.com/comp ... astics.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgt ... 3/ch04.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; (Wood. See page 4).
Life is not all lovely thorns and singing vultures, you know. -- Morticia Addams

Jeri3d
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Re: Physics properties

Post by Jeri3d » 16 Mar 2010, 03:57

Thanks alot for looking up those links!

Could you explain your caution about converting to TS scale and how that would be done. Thanks

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Finis
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Re: Physics properties

Post by Finis » 16 Mar 2010, 06:01

The TS units measure how how much energy is conserved in a collision. 100% would mean that the total energy in the colliding objects is equal before and after a collision although it is probably distributed differently among them. 50% means that half the energy was wasted. In practice, objects in TS physics will never stop moving, especially spinning, due to this loss of energy so something is not right there.

Hmm. I thought that the modulus of elasticity (related to deforming and returning to original shape) could be easily used to find how much energy is conserved in a collision but I could not find anything like that. If it is not related then what is?
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